Increase in truck accidents across nation's highways
New research suggests that older commercial truck drivers may be causing danger on the highways.
According to a recent CBS News article, the American trucking industry is struggling with a shortage of drivers. In an effort to compensate, many companies are recruiting retired truck drivers. Ten percent of commercial truck drivers are 65 years old, or older. According to CBS News correspondent Kris Van Cleave, the rules of the roads have not kept up with the times, raising the question:

Is more screening needed for commercial drivers?

  • In the summer of 2009, a semi driven by a 76-year-old rolled on top of three cars, killing ten people.
  • More recently, on Aug. 19 in Newark, New Jersey, a bus was T-boned by another N.J. Transit bus driven by a 70-year-old, killing two people.
  • A couple days later, on Aug. 25, a truck hauling stones driven by a 74-year-old slammed into traffic in a construction zone in Binghamton, New York, injuring ten people.

A CBS News analysis of crash data reveals that in just the last three years, 19 percent increase in accidents involving commercial truck and bus drivers in their 70s, 80s, and 90s. From 2013 to 2015, there were more than 6,636 truck and bus accidents involving elderly drivers in just 12 states.

“The industry is looking for truck drivers. There’s a shortage in truck drivers. So they’re not going to self-regulate. The only way that that could be done is on the federal level,” Oklahoma Highway Patrol Lt. James Loftis said.

Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration deputy administrator Daphne Jefferson acknowledged the increase in older commercial drivers. Her agency is currently studying the trend. She reported to CBS News, “We are not quite at the point yet where we are ready to say one way or another if there needs to be a change in driver rules for, say, drivers over 65.”


Leave a Comment





Is there an exclusive market available for your firm?

Area Pricing